This site uses cookies, your continued use implies you agree with our cookie policy. Dismiss

2 Candlestick Project

I turned the candlestick and divided the height by the width of the chisel, scoring deep lines between the bands of weave. I divided the length into 16 parts - it must be an even number!

Here, I'll also show you a really good way of holding a turned 'spindle' so that you can rotate the work and get at each part easily.

Comments:

| 26 February 2017 09:10

Jeff - It's the chisel's width and straightness of cutting edge that matters here. It doesn't matter whether the sides are parallel or tapering, even fishtail and you'll make the basket weave to fit the width of what chisel you have.
So, yes, no problem. Have a go!

| 24 February 2017 17:24

Chris, how do you think a number 1 25mm alongee chisel would do in this application, maybe another use for my letter carving chisel? just a thought.

| 13 December 2015 12:44

Joseph - Unless I specifically say otherwise on Woodcarving Workshops, I'm using a double-bevel, carving chisel. I'm sure one could make these cuts with a single-bevel, bench chisel but, myself, I prefer the double-bevel - I'm so used to the freedom of working ON the bevel as with other carving tools for a smooth (woven basket) curve, rather than the flat face of the bench chisel, which always wants to make a flat plane. But try it and see?

| 12 December 2015 14:35

HI CHRIS--IS THAT CHISEL A DOUBLE OR SINGLE BEVEL

| 12 September 2015 17:34

Jeffrey - Yes, exactly - about 1mm thick.. I actually made it myself from an industrial hacksaw blade which I mounted in a handle. I'm not sure you can buy one that thin but you could take an 1/8in. (3mm) one and narrow the tip. You don't have to go very deep, about the same, but you do want the divisions to be narrow for the best effect.

| 05 September 2015 16:43

Did you use a thin parting tool when dividing the bands on the lathe?

| 18 October 2014 10:36

Ann - The vice is at one end of this bench and as I didn't want the screw hole in both ends of the candlestick, I walked round, after adjusting the set up to the other side. Luckily my bench is free standing. If it weren't, I'd have to find an alternative way of holding the screw end, rather than the vice; some sort of block I could clamp to the bench. I've seen medieval etchings of carvers holding quite big carvings between screws like this - so not so original! - and I myself have carved four-poster bedposts on the bench in the same way.

| 18 October 2014 09:08

Chris, I love the holding aspect (with sudoku-think as always!) When you said you turned it around, did you really reverse the ends of the stick or moved yourself around to the other side?

Please login to post a comment